News from Boissevain School

June 9, 2013

Update – June 9 – 2013

Filed under: Education — Mr. White @ 8:23 pm

 

What’s Up at Boissevain School

 

Upcoming Dates:

June 10 – 14 – Walk to School Week

June 11 – CTS Luncheon – North Gym

June 19 – Gr. 12 Marks are due

June 21 – Gr. 9 to 11 marks are due

June 25 – Gr. 5 – 8 marks are due

June 24 – Boissevain School Graduation

June 25 – ECA Awards – Gr. 9 to 12

June 27 – MS awards – Gr. 5 to 8 – last day of classes

June 28 – Admin Day  – Gr. 9 to 12 Reports

 

√ Talk about being busy – Thank you all for the work you are doing lately – you are trying to teach and finalize curriculum items, you are planning field trips, coaching school teams and community ones, track meets, healthy lunches, advisory group lunches, marking, preparing exams and reports, volunteering for additional duty, covering for others, IEP meetings, AND EVERYTHING ELSE – Well Done!

√ High School – Advisory

Reminder – Master portfolio marks are due to office on JUNE 17

√ an interesting picture:  https://twitter.com/bcurrie5/status/313233946613776384/photo/1

√ – part two of learning about the RTI model involves understanding PBIS – we introduced the School Wide Discipline Plan at our last staff meetings to get some feedback – please read through the following to make yourself familiar with PBIS language – thank you.

 

Positive Behavioural Interventions and Supports (PBIS)

Positive Behavioural Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a proactive model which aims to prevent inappropriate behaviour through teaching and reinforcing appropriate behaviours (OSEP Technical Assistance Center on Positive Behavioural Interventions & Supports, 2007).

PBIS is a process that is consistent with the core principles of RTI.  Similar to RTI, PBIS offers a range of interventions that are systematically applied to students based on their demonstrated level of need and addresses the role of the environment as it applies to development and improvement of behaviour problems.

Both RTI and PBIS are grounded in differentiated instruction. Each approach delimits critical factors and components to be in place at the universal (Tier 1), targeted group (Tier 2) and individual (Tier 3) levels.

 

Core Principles of PBIS

  1. We can effectively teach appropriate behaviour to all children.  All PBIS practices are founded on the assumption and belief that all children can exhibit appropriate behaviour.  As a result, it is our responsibility to identify the contextual setting events and environmental conditions that enable exhibition of appropriate behaviour.  We then must determine the means and systems to provide those resources.
  2. Intervene early. It is best practice to intervene before targeted behaviours occur. If we intervene before problematic behaviours escalate, the interventions are much more manageable. Highly effective universal interventions in the early stages of implementation, which are informed by time sensitive continuous progress monitoring, enjoy strong empirical support for their effectiveness with at-risk students.
  3. Use of a multi-tiered model of service delivery. PBIS uses an efficient, needs driven resource deployment system to match behavioural resources with student need. To achieve high rates of student success for all students, instruction in the schools must be differentiated in both nature and intensity. To efficiently differentiate behavioural instruction for all students, PBIS uses tiered models of service delivery.
  4. Use research based, scientifically validated interventions to the extent available.  The purpose of this requirement is to ensure that students are exposed to curriculum and teaching that has demonstrated effectiveness for the type of student and the setting. Research based, scientifically validated interventions provide our best opportunity at implementing strategies that will be effective for a large majority of students.
  5. Monitor student progress to inform interventions.  The only method to determine if a student is improving is to monitor the student’s progress. The use of assessments that can be collected frequently and that are sensitive to small changes in student behaviour is recommended. Determining the effectiveness (or lack of) an intervention early is important to maximize the impact of that intervention for the student.

 

 

  1. Use data to make decisions. A data based decision regarding student response to the interventions is central to PBIS practices.  Decisions in PBIS practices are based on professional judgment informed directly by student office discipline referral data and performance data.  This principle requires that ongoing data collection systems are in place and that resulting data are used to make informed behavioural intervention planning decisions.
  2. Use assessment for three different purposes. In PBIS three types of assessments are used:       1) screening of data comparison per day per month for total office discipline referrals;               2) diagnostic determination of data by time of day, problem behaviour and location; and             3) progress monitoring to determine if the behavioural interventions are producing the desired                                                                                  effects.

What is Primary Prevention?

This description of Primary Prevention in School Wide Positive Behavioural Interventions and Supports (PBIS) details the process and practices for those who are first learning about this topic. Primary prevention is significant in that it moves the structural framework of each educational unit from reactive approaches to proactive systems change performance. This effort cohesively unites all the adults in using 1) common language; 2) common practices; and 3) consistent application of positive and negative reinforcement.

Behavioural Expectations

The primary prevention of positive behavioural interventions and supports (PBIS) consists of rules, routines and physical arrangements that are developed and taught by school staff to prevent initial occurrences of behaviour the school would like to target for change.  For example, a school team may determine that disrespect for self, others and property is a set of behaviours they would like to target for change. They may choose the positive reframing of that behaviour and make that one of their behavioural expectations. Respect Yourself, Others and Property would be one of their behavioural expectations.

Research indicates that three to five behavioural expectations that are positively stated, easy to remember and significant to the climate of the school are best.  At the end of the year, a researcher should be able to walk into the school and ask ten random students to name the behavioural expectations and 80% or better of the students should be able to tell the researcher what they are and give examples of what they look like in action.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Snapshot of PBIS

PBIS is not:

PBIS is:

…a canned program in a box for purchase. …a three to five year training commitment to address proactive systems changes in the “way schools do business.”
….changing everything we do or extinguishing current practices that are working to support students. …a way of taking all the great initiatives already implemented in the school and tying them together into a framework that works toward a common language, common practice and consistent application of positive and negative reinforcement.
…being disingenuous to children and giving them stickers. …teaching, modeling, practicing and rewarding appropriate behaviour and having clear consequences for targeted behaviours.
…ignoring inappropriate behaviour. …achieving full staff “buy-in” on consistent implementation of office discipline referrals. If it is not okay to cuss in classroom “A”, then it will not be okay to cuss in classroom “B”.
…something a bunch of people made up for the new pendulum to swing in the educational field. …rooted in evidence based practices which adults use to respond to the interventions needed to address behavioural and academic competence for each and every student.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PBIS/RTI Implementation Timeline

“Awareness “

  • Tom Schimmer – Voluntary PBIS Introductory PD – Spring, 2013
  • Chris Weber – Sept 3, 2013 System Wide In-service during 2013/14 school year which will include all teachers from the TMSD.
  • Tom Schimmer – System Wide In-service (if PD committee feels he should come back?) during 2013/14 school year which will include all teachers from the TMSD.
  • Draft/Create School Wide Discipline Plan, Discipline Response Guide and  School Wide Behavioural Matrix – 2013-14
  • Begin tracking of discipline referrals aligning with discipline response guide to gain baseline data – September, 2014

“Exploration”

  • Formation of a “School Climate Team” and draft goals based on data  – 2014-2015
  • Review and implementation of School Wide Discipline Plan, Discipline Response Guide and  School Wide Behavioural Matrix – 2014-2015
  • Continue tracking of discipline referrals and review of strategies

“Synthesis”

  • Refinement of School Wide Behavioural Matrix – 2015-2016
  • Continue tracking of discipline referrals and review of strategies

“Refinement”

  • PBIS embedded in daily practice and school culture – 2016-2017
  • 80% of all students should be able to name the behavioural expectations of the school and give examples of what they look like in action – 2016-2017

 

 

 

 

June 3, 2013

Update – June 3 – 2013

Filed under: Education — Mr. White @ 12:57 am

 

What’s Up at Boissevain School

 

Upcoming Dates:

June 3 – Boissevain School Track Meet

June 4 – MS TMSD Track Meet

June 4 – Cafeteria Closes

June 5 – AAA Spirit Day

June 7 – 4 – H Rally Day

June 11 – CTS Luncheon – North Gym

June 19 – Gr. 12 Marks are due

June 21 – Gr. 9 to 11 marks are due

June 25 – Gr. 5 – 8 marks are due

June 24 – Boissevain School Graduation

June 25 – ECA Awards – Gr. 9 to 12

June 27 – MS awards – Gr. 5 to 8 – last day of classes

June 28 – Admin Day  – Gr. 9 to 12 Reports

 

√ High School – Advisory

June 3 – 8 am – Student Selection for advisory

June 5 – 11 am – Advisory Lunch – Welcome Grade 8 students

 

√ – It is important again to continue to understand the RTI model being implemented in TMSD – it will be the focus of our September 3 & 4 PD and Admin Days– Please read the following information  – it is better to be informed.

√ The RTI committee will meet before the end of June to identify the key features of the RTI model that we will address on September 3 & 4

 

Preamble:

Response to Intervention (RTI) is a multi-tiered approach that is used to help students be successful in their learning.  Through gap analysis, students’ progress is closely monitored at each stage of intervention to determine the need for further research based instruction and/or intervention.

 

TMSD Mission Statement:

The students are the focus of our efforts.  The division strives to provide an education that prepares individuals for a meaningful life in a changing world.  We promote a learning environment that begins in the home, continues in the school and is supported by the community.

 

Vision:

Empowering all students to succeed.

 

RTI exists in TMSD to provide all students, teachers and parents with positive behavioural and academic interventions and supports.

 

Values:
TMSD believes that through RTI there shall be:

  • Effective communication among all stakeholders.
  • Authentic involvement of students, teachers and parents.

 

Purpose of RTI:

  • To create an efficient, effective and relevant process to input, retrieve and utilize behavioural and/or academic data.
  • Establish consistency around process.
  • Transition student data from year to year.
  • Provide a framework to support interventions for the classroom teacher.

 

Why RTI?

1. RTI allows educators to proactively identify students who are struggling with academics and/or behaviours. It allows schools to plan collaboratively and to provide targeted interventions to all students.

2. RTI aligns with the philosophy that all students can learn.

3. RTI supports the philosophy of inclusion.

 

RTI means…
  • All students must receive teaching based on best practice at Tier 1 before moving into Tier 2 and 3.
  • Assessment and data collection must occur in all tiers in order to gauge success and determine future interventions.
  • Involving more than one strategy or intervention.
  • A framework for all students.
  • A systematic process for ensuring that all students learn.

 

 

Definitions:

 

Baseline:  The student’s current level of performance in his or her focus area for improvement prior to implementation of an intervention.

Benchmark:  Important student outcomes or goals for a grade within a particular domain (e.g. reading), that students should be achieving during the course of a school year (e.g. fall, winter, spring) in order to be on target for end‐of‐grade performance by the end of that school year.

Case Manager:  A person who assists in the planning, co-ordination, monitoring and evaluation of an individual student’s success plan.

Data Driven Decision Making:  The process of planning for student success (both academic and behavioural) through the use of ongoing progress monitoring and analysis of its data.

Differentiated Instruction:  An approach to teaching that emphasizes ways to meet the differing needs of a group of students within the general education setting.  For example, through the use of flexible small groups, varied instructional materials or different ways of presenting the same content; differentiation of instruction is an integral part of Tier I.

 

Flexible Grouping:  Grouping of students that is changeable based on the purpose of the instructional activity and on changes in the instructional needs of individual students over time.

Frequency:  How often a behaviour or an intervention occurs.  Commonly used in Functional Behavioural Analysis (FBA) and Response to Intervention (RTI) research in the context of the three most important factors in considering behaviours of concern:  Frequency, Intensity and Duration.  Frequency of an intervention, as an element of its effectiveness, can be a focus of the fidelity of delivery.

Gap Analysis:  Gap Analysis is a tool for measuring the difference between the student’s current level of performance and benchmark expectations.

Homogeneous Grouping:  Grouping of students with similar instructional needs who are at similar levels, such as students who all require instruction in basic math skills.

Intervention:  The systematic and explicit instruction provided to accelerate growth in an area of identified need.  Interventions are provided by both special and general educators and are based on training, not titles. They are designed to improve performance relative to a specific, measurable goal. Interventions are based on valid information about current performance, realistic implementation and include ongoing student progress monitoring.

PBIS:  (Positive Behaviour Intervention and Supports) is a broad range of systematic and individualized strategies for achieving important social and learning outcomes while preventing problem behaviour with all students. It is about the redesigning and improving of teaching and learning environments focusing on positive behaviours for both adults and students.

 

 

Progress Monitoring:  Progress Monitoring is the ongoing process that involves collecting and analyzing data to determine student progress toward specific skills or general outcomes.  Progress monitoring generates the useful data for making instructional decisions based on the review and analysis of student data.  Monitoring student progress, through collection and analysis of data, is an effective way to determine if the instruction being delivered is meeting the needs of the student.

Research Based Instruction/Intervention/Practice:    A research based instructional practice or intervention is one found to be reliable, trustworthy and valid based on evidence to suggest that, when the program is used with a particular group of children, the children can be expected to make adequate gains in achievement.  Ongoing documentation and analysis of student outcomes helps to define effective practice.  In the absence of evidence, the instruction/intervention must be considered “best practice” based on available research and professional literature.

Response to Intervention (RTI) Is a multi-tiered approach that is used to help students when they are not learning. Students’ progress is closely monitored at each stage of intervention to determine the need for further research based instruction and/or intervention. The term “Response to Instruction” can be used interchangeably with “Response to Intervention”.

 

Tier 1: Is the instructional program that occurs in classrooms meant for all students including differentiating to meet student needs. This can refer to both academic and/or behavioural needs.

 

Tier 2:  Is the instructional program that provides additional support to students who struggle in the classroom or Tier 1 setting. Whenever possible Tier 2 interventions should be classroom based.  The interventions are more targeted, intense and focused.  RTI leadership team works as a support for the classroom teacher.

 

Tier 3:  Represents a highly specialized and intense level of intervention for individual students whose needs are significant and require interventions from an extended team. Tier 3 interventions are implemented when Tier 1 and Tier 2 strategies are not effective on their own. Supports from outside agencies are needed complimenting tier 1 and 2 interventions and supports provided by the classroom teacher and RTI leadership team which will be ongoing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 27, 2013

Update – May 26 – 2013

Filed under: Education — Mr. White @ 4:06 am

What’s Up at Boissevain School

Upcoming Dates:

May 28 – Middle School Track Meet

May 29 – BU – Mini University Presentation in the Primary Open Area – K to 6

May 29 – Spring Band Concert

May 30 – Student Led Conferences (K to 12) – 5 pm to 7 pm

June 4 – MS TMSD Track Meet

June 4 – Cafeteria Closes

June 5 – AAA Spirit Day

June 7 – 4 – H Rally Day

June 11 – CTS Luncheon – North Gym

June 19 – Gr. 12 Marks are due

June 21 – Gr. 9 to 11 marks are due

June 25 – Gr. 5 – 8 marks are due

June 24 – Boissevain School Graduation

June 25 – ECA Awards – Gr. 9 to 12

June 27 – MS awards – Gr. 5 to 8 – last day of classes

June 28 – Admin Day  – Gr. 9 to 12 Reports

Reminders:  Please mark on your calendars!

Staff Mtgs:

Primary –??????    MS – ???????    HS  – ?????????

(please submit items on the staff wiki or let me know – Meetings are in Meeting Room)

√ Brandon University is scheduled to present their Mini University information for K to 6 students this Wednesday, May 29 at 11 am in the Primary Open area – please take your class down right after recess – it is about 20 minutes – thank you

√ High School – Advisory

May 29 – Advisory

√ Looking ahead to Report cards in June our practice has been to provide a general comment at end the year – the new reports are requiring teachers to keep with the strengths, challenges and next steps – You have done an excellent job with the comments throughout the year and I feel for the end of the year comments that you should be allowed to provide a general, end of the year comment, not the type you provided on the last reports.   We can revisit what the comments will look like for next year, next year.

√ – this is good:

What is a teacher’s job?

What is a teacher’s job? “If a doctor, lawyer, or dentist had 40 people in his office at one time, all of whom had different needs, and some of whom didn’t want to be there and were causing trouble, and the doctor, lawyer, or dentist, without assistance, had to treat them all with professional excellence for nine months, then he might have some conception of the classroom teacher’s job.”  ~Donald D. Quinn

√√  Prof. Nantais sent this the other day:

6 Ways to Let Students Know You Care

1. Greet Them

Stand by the door and greet all students by name as they enter.

2. 2×10 

Spend two minutes a day for 10 consecutive days with a disengaged student.

3. George’s Book

Inspired by a teacher named George, select five students to focus on in each class. The awareness of the students’ unique strengths will have an enormous impact on the engagement and achievement of even the most disengaged adolescents.

4. My Life in Six Words

Legend has it that when Ernest Hemingway was challenged to write a novel in six words, he wrote, “For Sale: Baby shoes, never worn.” Invite your students to tell you how they are doing, using exactly six words.

5. Debrief with Students

Class meetings give you a way to check in with all of your students, and they build students’ commitment to community. You can also debrief more informally by asking your students, “What do you think went well for us today?” and “What do we need to do to make further progress tomorrow?”

6. Attend Extracurricular Events

There’s no question this recommendation is asking a lot of busy teachers, but they’ll know that you care enough to support them by attending events outside the classroom.

 

May 12, 2013

Update – May 12 – 2013

Filed under: Uncategorized — Mr. White @ 10:12 pm

 

What’s Up at Boissevain School

 

Upcoming Dates:

May 17 & 18 – Bronco Girls Fastball Tournament

May 28 – Middle School Track Meet

May 29 – Spring Band Concert

May 30 – Student Led Conferences (K to 12) – 5 pm to 7 pm

June 4 – MS TMSD Track Meet

June 4 – Cafeteria Closes

June 5 – AAA Spirit Day

June 7 – 4 – H Rally Day

June 11 – CTS Luncheon – North Gym

June 24 – Boissevain School Graduation

 

Reminders:  Please mark on your calendars!

Staff Mtgs: 

Primary – May 14  – 3:30    MS – May 15  – 8 am    HS  – May 13 – 3:30

(please submit items on the staff wiki or let me know – Meetings are in Meeting Room)

 

 

 

√ The Grade 10’s are going to Winnipeg on Wednesday – they participate in the skills workshop as part of career development in HS

 

√ The Bronco Girls are hosting their Fastball tournament this Friday and Saturday – 8 teams in attendance – hope the weather is a little warmer than this past weekend in Winkler – the wind and cold was nasty!

 

√ HS Student Government has their annual Bucky Awards to present and it is arranged for May 22 at 2:50 (end of advisory)  for Gr. 9 to 12 students – please bring your advisory group to the North Gym.

 

 

 

 

√ High School – Advisory

 

May 15 – No Advisory

May 22 – Advisory – Bucky Awards (2:50)

May 29 – Advisory

 

 

 

 

√√  check this site out –  research on the 7 best ways to improve students achievement

 

http://edudemic.com/2013/05/ways-to-improve-student-achievement/

 

 

 

 

May 5, 2013

Update – May 5 – 2013

Filed under: Education — Mr. White @ 5:16 pm

 

What’s Up at Boissevain School

 

Upcoming Dates:

May 17 & 18 – Bronco Girls Fastball Tournament

May 28 – Middle School Track Meet

May 29 – Spring Band Concert

May 30 – Student Led Conferences

June 4 – MS TMSD Track Meet

June 4 – Cafeteria Closes

June 5 – AAA Spirit Day

June 7 – 4 – H Rally Day

June 11 – CTS Luncheon – North Gym

June 24 – Boissevain School Graduation

 

Reminders:  Please mark on your calendars!

Staff Mtgs:

Primary – May 14  – 3:30    MS – May 15  – 8 am    HS  – May 13 – 3:30

(please submit items on the staff wiki or let me know – Meetings are in Meeting Room)

√ We are required to do bus evacuations this week – it is scheduled to start on Tuesday,May 7 at 9:10 – we will call you to the buses – please accompany your classes.

Also – there will be a fire drill this week – we will need to do a few before the end of June

We have met our lockdown requirements of two.

√ The HS Student Government has their annual Bucky Awards to present and it is being arranged for May 22 at 2:50 (end of advisory)  for Gr. 9 to 12 students – please bring your advisory group to the North Gym.

√ Primary – Lawrence has a prototype of the flower box that he will be making for the primary classrooms as part of the outdoor classrooms – the cost is covered by the grant provided by the Morton Foundation – as he finishes one he will bring it over so that you can use it – maybe even transplant some of your plants you are starting in your room – you will need to purchase some soil for your class flower box – please submit those bills to be reimbursed.

√ We need to get the dates organized for the School Calendar Magnets – can you please look at your plans for next year and send any known dates to Evelyn or Joan as soon as you can – thank you!

√ High School – Advisory

May 8 – Advisory

May 15 – No Advisory

May 22 – Advisory – Bucky Awards (2:50)

May 29 – Advisory

 

√√  this is a good article about relationships that has a TED X video at the end – If you don’t read the article be sure to watch the video – 7 minutes – worth it

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/angela-maiers/secure-students-hearts_b_3208029.html

 

 

√√  check this site out –  27 things teachers do best – tweeted by Ian Jukes

 

http://edudemic.com/2013/04/27-things-teachers-do-best/

 

√√ some younger grades blogs

https://docs.google.com/document/d/12JStVT0gMggozJVqXH9lSCzrZZp98X_SlwxOCGyhMBE/edit?pli=1

 

 

√√ I listened to some tech short cuts the other day on you tube

  1. to scroll down a webpage press the space bar – to go back up press the shift key and then the space bar – it goes one page at a time
  2. to make the print larger on a webpage (mac) – press the command key and then the plus to make larger – command and minus to make smaller
  3. In Powerpoint – if you want to black out a slide – press the B – if you want to have a white screen – press the W

 

 

 

April 28, 2013

Update – April 28 – 2013

Filed under: Education — Mr. White @ 4:12 pm

 

What’s Up at Boissevain School

 

Upcoming Dates:

May 17 & 18 – Bronco Girls Fastball Tournament

May 20 – Victoria Day – No Classes

May 28 – Middle School Track Meet

May 29 – Spring Band Concert

May 30 – Student Led Conferences

June 4 – MS TMSD Track Meet

June 4 – Cafeteria Closes

June 5 – AAA Spirit Day

June 7 – 4 – H Rally Day

June 11 – CTS Luncheon – North Gym

June 24 – Boissevain School Graduation

 

Reminders:  Please mark on your calendars!

Staff Mtgs:

Primary – May 14  – 3:30    MS – May 15  – 8 am    HS  – May 13 – 3:30

(please submit items on the staff wiki or let me know – Meetings are in Meeting Room)

 

 

√ wouldn’t hurt to remind your class or advisory group of the bike helmet law starting on Wednesday – May 1

Here are the details – Please share:

Cyclists under 18 will have to wear a bicycle helmet as of May 1 in Manitoba

The province says each year in Manitoba about 160 cyclists end up in hospital from cycling-related injuries and several collisions result in serious injury or death. About 40 per cent of cycling injuries involve children. Wearing a helmet while cycling can reduce the chance of serious head and brain injury by more than 85 per cent in the event of a crash.

√ High School – Advisory

May 1 – No Advisory

May 8 – Advisory

May 15 – No Advisory

May 22 – Advisory

May 29 – Advisory

 

Covering Curriculum

 

“The greatest enemy of understanding is coverage.”

 

-Howard Gardner

Here’s a story I share to describe my take on the folly of covering curriculum:

 

Pretend you are a bus driver and have been asked to make a dozen stops where children will be waiting to be  picked up so you can take them to school. Before you can leave the bus compound, your supervisor reminds you to arrive on time, and if you are late, you will be held accountable.

 

You pull out of the compound and make your way to the first stop. Upon arriving you notice no one is there, but you stop anyways and open the door. Just over the horizon, you see three kids running as fast as they can, so you wait. Winded and short of breath, the boys get on the bus, thanking you for waiting. While you pull away for your next stop, you tell them it was no problem. After all, you’re just glad they are going to make it to school.

 

At the next three stops, you find yourself again waiting for kids that need more time to get on board. You paid no special attention to these events during the first couple stops, but now, after making the first half dozen stops, you start to look at your watch.

 

You’re getting short on time.

 

You plod on to the next stop, but you are immediately disheartened to see the kids are not sitting on the bench waiting for the bus. Instead, they are off in the distance, still making their way to where they are suppose to be.

 

You stop the bus, but instead of opening the door, you look at your watch. You’re not late yet, but you have no time to spare…

 

… you look up to see the kids are still a good distance away…

 

… you look at your watch…

 

… you look at the kids, but they are no closer…

 

… you look at your watch…

 

… you grimace and bite your upper lip…

 

… and then you do it – you shut the door and step on the accelerator – leaving the kids behind.

 

As you accelerate, you look at your watch, seeing time tick by. While thinking of your supervisors departing words “you will be held accountable”, you surpass the legal speed limit.

 

You approach the second last stop. There’s no one on the bench. You have an idea where the kids are, but you can’t bring yourself to look. The bench is empty, so you drive on by.

 

You’re not particularly proud of what you just did, but you calm you conscience by looking at your watch – you’ve got time to be on time.

 

Then you get stuck at a red light. Suddenly you don’t have the little time you thought you had left. The next stop is straight ahead, and the kids are even sitting there waiting. Hope encourages a smile.

 

Both your smile and hope evaporates as the red ember from the light etches itself into your optical nerve. The incessant ticktocking from your watch has you convinced Captain Hook had every right to be disturbed.

 

The light turns green and you’re off like a shot. One more stop, but you have no time.

 

While the kids stand up in anticipation of your arrival, you blow right past them. They may be stunned, but you arrive on time.

 

You pull up to the school and open the door. As the lucky few disembark, you can’t seem to tame that raw feeling of disappointment. At first, you want to ask yourself “what the hell did I accomplish?” but you realize the real question is “what the hell did I not accomplish?”

 

 

April 21, 2013

Update – April 21 – 2013

Filed under: Uncategorized — Mr. White @ 5:13 pm

 What’s Up at Boissevain School

Upcoming Dates:

April 25 – Val Caldwell – Social Media – Gr. 11 & 12 – 12:30 pm – North Gym

April 25 – Social Media – Val Caldwell – Parent Session – North – Band Room – 7 pm

May 28 – Middle School Track Meet

June 4 – MS TMSD Track Meet

June 4 – Cafeteria Closes

June 5 – AAA Spirit Day

 

Reminders:  Please mark on your calendars!

Staff Mtgs: 

Primary – May 14  – 3:30    MS – May 15  – 8 am    HS  – May 13 – 3:30

(please submit items on the staff wiki or let me know – Meetings are in Meeting Room)

 

√ High School – Advisory

April 14 Regular  Advisory

May 1 – No Advisory

 

√√ Corey had read through this article/link –  it’s from the techie world and Couros.

 

http://people-equation.com/5-ways-to-overcome-resistance-to-change/

 

5 Ways to Overcome Resistance to Change

 

Guest Post by Phil Buckley

Most people would agree that change isn’t easy. Many people, however, seem surprised when people don’t embrace it. We are creatures of habit, so it seems natural that most people will have difficulty giving up things they are comfortable with for the unknown.

A leader once told me that he had let his team know that resistance to a new structure would not be tolerated. After speaking with his team members, I confirmed that he had successfully driven challenges underground along with advice on how to make the change more successful. Unfortunately, he had also lost the trust, support and engagement of the people who were tasked with making the change. It didn’t go well.

When people question a change, they are demonstrating an interest in the business and their role in it. They may not understand the reason for the change and the benefits it will provide, or may have a different perspective based on facts and experiences that are unknown to the leader. Either way, resistance is the beginning of a conversation about what is best for the business. It also is an opportunity to energize people about a new and exciting future.

Here are five ways to overcome resistance to change:

  • Ban “resistance” from your vocabulary. Language is a powerful tool that can bias your thoughts and behaviors. It is your role to help people “climb the rope” to the future versus pulling it in the wrong direction. Using positive language is an important starting point. Phrases such as “addressing concerns” and “discussing changes to routines” help position discussions in a positive light that will reduce tensions people may be experiencing.
  • Ask for concerns when describing the vision behind the change. It is better to know what the areas of concern are versus making assumptions about what they may be. People know best what is on their minds and demonstrating that you value their views is the first step to influencing them.
  • Identify “early adopters” who support the change. These people are advocates for the new ways of working. They are also peers who speak the same language as their team mates. Ensure they participate in forums about the change so their voices can be heard.
  • Build in as much certainty as you can—what is going to happen and when, what aspects will change and what will stay the same? People are more likely to feel stressed when they don’t feel in control of their environment. When people don’t know the details they often assume the worst possible outcome. You can reduce stress levels and fear by reducing the unknown. Share details freely and ask for input on the ones that aren’t yet defined.
  • Share how you will prepare people to take on new ways of working. People usually react positively to a well thought out plan to transition to new routines. They also react negatively to little or no support. Make sure there is sufficient help available, that managers have all the tools they need to assist their team members and people know the investment being made to help them.

Socrates said that “The secret of change is to focus all of your energy not on fighting the old, but on building the new.” The leader’s role is to help people take on new ways of working that will create a better future.  When people’s concerns are positively addressed, most will do their part in making it come to life.

About the Author:  Phil Buckley

 

With 20-plus years of experience developing and executing change strategies for global businesses, Phil Buckley has managed 28 large-scale change projects — including the $19.6 billion Kraft Foods acquisition of Cadbury. Having the confidence to tackle any change project is a quality every leader should possess. In his new book, Change with Confidence: Answers to the 50 Biggest Questions that Keep Change Leaders Up at Night (Jossey-Bass), Phil Buckley — senior change management professional — highlights the 50 most pressing questions that keep leaders up at night.

 

 

 

 

April 14, 2013

Update – April 14 – 2013

Filed under: Education — Mr. White @ 7:32 pm

 

What’s Up at Boissevain School

 

Upcoming Dates:

April 14 – 18 – Cantando Band Trip – Edmonton

April 16 – HS reports go home

April 17 – HS Staff Meeting (Note Change)

April 18 – HS Interviews

April 18 – Preschool Wellness Day

April 25 – Val Caldwell – Social Media – Gr. 11 & 12 – 12:30 pm – North Gym

April 25 – Social Media – Val Caldwell – Parent Session – North – Band Room – 7 pm

May 28 – Middle School Track Meet

June 4 – MS TMSD Track Meet

June 4 – Cafeteria Closes

June 5 – AAA Spirit Day

 

Reminders:  Please mark on your calendars!

Staff Mtgs:

Primary – May 14  – 3:30    MS – May 15  – 8 am    HS  – April 17 – 3:30 then May 13

(as always, submit items on the staff wiki or let me know – Meetings are in Meeting Room)

√ teaching staff – please remember to complete the survey I emailed to you with regards to Al and Myself by April 26th – thank you.

 

√ High School – Advisory

April 17 Regular  Advisory

 

√√ Committee updates:

School Plan and PBIS – Positive Behaviour Intervention System

Brad, Al, Corey, Roxy, Patty, Shawn, Bob, Sonia H

 

RTI – Response to Intervention – School Team

Brad, Al, Krista, Sonia S., Pam, Bob, Primary –  Roxy , Middle Years – Travis

High School –  Keith  &  Tracey

 

 

√√√√ Redefining Fair – Damian Cooper – I have read through the last chapters of the book Redefining Fair – it focuses on our work we are doing with report cards, assessment and essential outcomes – I am sure the changes we are seeing are the result f Damian Cooper and other’s work

Some final comments by Damian Cooper:

–       as educators we are in the midst of unprecedented change

–       as teachers, we must continue to improve our craft

–       every classroom today needs to be differentiated

–       we must constantly reflect upon our current practices

–       we must examine what is working and what is not

–       we must problem solve to become more effective teachers

 

** I have the book in my office for you to read so please come and get it – there are a number of case studies in the book that are interesting to read and are at all levels from K to 12.

 

√√√√ I attended a mLRC workshop last week – here is one post to share

Four Essential Questions in Unit Planning

  1. What do all students need to know and be able to do?
  2. How do we teach so that all students learn?
  3. How will we know if they have learned it?
  4. What will we do if they don’t know it or if they come to us already knowing?

 

√√√√ Interesting read

http://the21stcenturyprincipal.blogspot.ca/2013/04/blueprint-for-moving-to-21st-century.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+The21stCenturyPrincipal+(The+21st+Century+Principal)

 

 

 

 

 

April 7, 2013

Update – April 7 – 2013

Filed under: Education — Mr. White @ 7:42 pm

What’s Up at Boissevain School

Upcoming Dates:

April 9 – MS Staff Meeting

April 10 – Primary Staff Meeting

April 10 – HS Dance

April 14 – 18 – Cantando Band Trip – Edmonton

April 16 – HS reports go home

April 17 – HS Staff Meeting (Note Change)

April 18 – HS Interviews

April 25 – Val Caldwell – Social Media Presentation – Gr. 11 & 12 – pm – North Gym

June 4 – Cafeteria Closes

June 5 – AAA Spirit Day

Reminders:  Please mark on your calendars!

Staff Mtgs:

Primary – April 10  – 3:30    MS – April 9  – 8 am    HS  – April 17 – 3:30

(as always, submit items on the staff wiki or let me know – Meetings are in Meeting Room)

√ √√√√  Announcement:

Keith Forsyth received the MHSAA Coach of the month award for March – Congratulations Keith

Newly Hired Positions for Boissevain School:

:Tracey Fingas  – 1.0 Teacher general position in Boissevain.

:Grant Harrison- 1.0 limited position until the end of June in Boissevain.

√ I received a calendar of mRLC workshops for next year – some of you have been actively involve this year and the cost was looked after by the division – next year will be our responsibility to take care of costs although there may some specific workshops the DBO will be requesting participants. If you are interested in seeing the list/and carrying on with some of the mLRC work, please see Al or myself.

√ The Fastball and Baseball teams helped move the Coop on Saturday Night and Sunday Morning – the new store is sure nice – pretty exciting

(We sure have nice kids in our building to help with things like this)

√ High School – Advisory

April 10 Regular  Advisory

√√√√  I liked reading the following – you see a lot of these in our classrooms:

http://classroom-aid.com/2013/03/19/20-quick-actions-you-can-do-today-to-set-your-classroom-up-for-massive-success/

√√√ this is worth taking a look at:

The 8 Elements Project-Based Learning Must Have

Added by Jeff Dunn on 2013-03-22

If you’re contemplating using Project-Based Learning or are already trying out the latest craze to hit the modern classroom, you should know about this checklist. It details if you’re actually doing it correctly. For example, does your project focus on significant content, develop 21st century skills, and engage students in in-depth inquiry (just to name a few)? If not, you might want to reconsider your PBL approach.

See Also:  What Is Project-Based Learning?

The checklist is by the PBL masters over at BIE and they’ve outlined 8 different ‘essential elements’ that must be present in a project in order for it to be considered PBL. While you may agree, disagree, or think there should be some additional elements, this checklist is phenomenal.

These elements are actually useful for even more than PBL. In fact, I’d say that it’s extremely important to make sure ANY lesson helps develop 21st century skills, organizes tasks around a driving question, and encourages voice and choice. Along with the other handful of key features too.

What do you think about this PBL Checklist? I personally find it broad enough to be useful and precise enough to make sense. Do you think it’s lacking or perfect? Would love to hear your input!

http://edudemic.com/2012/10/what-is-project-based-learning/

March 17, 2013

Update – March 17 – 2013

Filed under: Education — Mr. White @ 8:37 pm

 

What’s Up at Boissevain School

 

Upcoming Dates:

 

March 18 – High School Information Night – 7 pm in Band Room

March 19 – Band Concert – North Gym – 7:30pm

March 19  – Blood Donor Clinic – South Gym

April 3  – Live Differently – Gr. 7 to 12 – 2 pm

April 5 – MADD – Gr. 9 to 12 – 9 am

April 14 – 18 – Cantando Band Trip – Edmonton

April 16 – HS reports go home

April 18 – HS Interviews

April 25 – Val Caldwell – Social Media Presentation – Gr. 11 & 12 – pm – North Gym

June 4 – Cafeteria Closes

June 5 – AAA Spirit Day

 

Reminders:  Please mark on your calendars!

Staff Mtgs:  I think we can move through March without a regular staff meeting

Primary – April 10  – 3:30    MS – April 15  – 8 am    HS  – April 8 – 3:30

(as always, submit items on the staff wiki or let me know – Meetings are in Meeting Room)

 

√ The recycling program is as strong as ever with the added containers and support of students and staff – one problem has popped up as all garbage is being placed in the the pop bottle container in the MS hallway – we could get rid of the containers but this is more about respect for the recycling program – no one should have to pick garbage out of the blue containers – Could Gr. 5 to 8 teachers please address this with your classrooms.

I know that it is not just Gr. 5 to 8 but it’s a start. The Pop bottle container in the HS is pretty good.

Thanks for your help.

√ We will have a Lockdown Practice on Thursday morning – please refresh the proper details with your class and remind yourself of your responsibilities – locking doors, etc.

√ Mike N. is completing his interviews with some staff Monday and Tuesday – the schedule was sent out last week

√ I have completed the 1st Course Selections for next year with Gr. 8 & 9 – I will be around to go over the selections with Gr. 11 & 12 this week.

√ The HS staff meeting was scheduled for Monday, April 8 but there is a TMTA meeting in Killarney at 4:30 that day – I have rescheduled the HS meeting for Monday, April 15

 

√ High School – Advisory

March 20 Seminar Day

12 – Career Cruising

11 – Resume Prep

10 – Study Skills

9 – What are my Values?

Spring Break

 

April 3 No Advisory – Live Differently Presentation – Gr. 7 to 12

 

April 10 Regular Advisory

 

***Please see Corey if you would like to have a subscription to the Advisory/Arts & Culture calendar***

 

√√√√ Please be prepared to report on PD that you have attended since the last staff meeting – use the 3 – 2 – 1 process:

3 Highlights – 2 Questions you have – 1 item you implement in the school.

 

 

√√√√ This weeks thoughts from Damian Cooper’s Book called Redefining Fair

Chapter 4 asked the question: HOW SHOULD I ASSESS STUDENTS’ NEEDS IN THE MIXED – ABILITY CLASS?

It Says:

–        when curriculum and instruction are not tailored to the needs of students, some find learning too challenging, while others find it boring.

–        In either case, the consequences are often similar: disengagement, truancy, failure to complete assigned work and inappropriate behavior

–        Cooper wrote about his observations in a Gr. 2 class – all students were enthusiastically engaged in their learning – students were well behaved and respectful to each other – students were resourceful, relying upon each other for support – the teacher moved easily and efficiently throughout the room – different materials used at different stations reflected thorough planning and preparation

–        He also writes about his experience in Gr. 9 English – he collected evidence on their writing by getting responses to a newspaper article, a video, a creative writing prompt, a response to a personal letter  – by examining their writing in all of these modes (descriptive, expository, creative and personal), he was able to build a student profile and adjust the learning from that evidence.

 

 

√√√√  I have not seen one of these for a while – the music is the same but the

clips are a little different – 4 minutes

https://sites.google.com/site/ictatbu/digital-leaners—video

 

 

 

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